About

paddle your own canoe

David Palazón (born 1972, Barcelona) is a designer, documentary filmmaker and photographer, producer, curator and visual artist. He studied art and design in his native Barcelona, prior moving to the UK, where he completed his studies at the London College of Communication and Royal College of Art. He works on international projects bringing visual arts and human beings together in original and creative ways. Driven by a curious nature for exploration and with a unique sense of humour, his work is a constant enquiry about the human condition.

David’s work has won several international awards. His ethnographic documentary “Wawata-Topu – Mermaids of Timor-Leste“ received the “Chandrika Sharma’ Special Prize at the Pêcheurs du Monde International Film Festival (France), and was selected Best Foreign Documentary at the AOFA in New York. His film “Uma Lulik” (The Sacred House), was the first indigenous documentary produced in Timor-Leste, receiving the 3rd Audience Prize at the Brisbane International Film Festival in 2011. His latest photobook “Timor Runguranga“ is part of the TATE Gallery’s Martin Parr photobook collection.

He has exhibited worldwide such as the Aichi World Expo 2005 in Japan or the Benaki Museum in Athens during documenta 14. He has collaborated with development and humanitarian organisations, including several UN agencies, and has experience working as a project manager, curator, researcher and teacher. He has travelled widely in nearly 50 countries and has lived in the Netherlands, UK, Peru, Ghana, Timor-Leste, Indonesia, Cuba, Sri Lanka and Palestine. He is currently based in Cox’s Bazar (Bangladesh) and working on an experimental documentary about his recent 330km journey on foot across Palestine. He is keen on people, mountains and coconuts.

Get in touch with David here. Follow him on Facebook and Instagram, check his filmography on Vimeo, browse editorial design samples on Issuu, read some of his published work on Academia, and buy some of his prints on Saatchi Art.

 

 

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